Graphics

  • The proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment would send neutrinos straight through the earth from Batavia, Illinois, to Lead, South Dakota. No tunnel would be necessary for this 1,300-km (800-mile) trip.
    Credit: Sandbox Studios
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  • A view looking south (east is to the left, west to the right) The beam is generated at Fermilab and intersects a detector at the Sanford Underground Research Facility. Credit: Symmetry Magazine
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  • 3D view of the LBNE 10-kt far detector design, to be located 4,850 ft underground, showing a lateral cross-section of the two 5-kt vessels that will house the liquid argon TPC detectors
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  • Schematic of the upstream portion of the LBNE neutrino beamline showing the major components. This portion is downstream from the proton (primary) beamline, which extracts protons from Fermilab's Main Injector and directs resulting proton beam towards the target assembly shown here. From left to right (the direction of the beam): the beam window, horn-protection baffle and target assembly, the two toroidal focusing horns and the decay pipe. (See LBNE Beamline for a description.)

  • Scientists plan to send the world's highest-intensity neutrino beam from Fermilab 1,300 km through the Earth's mantle to the Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota. The Proton Improvement Plan II (PIP-II) would provide more protons for the Main Injector and greatly increase the number of neutrinos that can be produced. Credit: Fermilab and Sandbox Studios
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  • The Intensity Frontier is one of three research frontiers in particle physics and includes neutrino research. Because neutrinos interact rarely with matter, scientists increase the chance of observing neutrino interactions by using accelerators to create high-intensity neutrino beams. Credit: HEPAP
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  • Scientists have discovered three types of neutrinos. As neutrinos travel through matter and space, they transform into each other. A muon neutrino created at Fermilab would be a mixture of all three types of neutrinos by the time it arrived at the Far Detector. Credit: symmetry magazine
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  • Scientists have discovered that neutrinos have tiny masses, in contradiction to the theoretical model that describes neutrino interactions. Credit: symmetry magazine
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  • Layout of experiments at the 4,850-ft level in the Sanford Underground Research Facility
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  • A model of the Beamline-Measurements (BLM) Systems envisioned, as of September 2012, to be placed downstream of the beamline at Fermilab. On the left are three variable-pressure, gas Cherenkov counters. Following these counters is a 5x5 ion-chamber array, and on the right is a set of stopped-muon counters interspersed between walls of steel "blue blocks", used for muon absorption. (Credit: LANL)
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  • Above: During construction of a 35-ton capacity liquid argon prototype cryostat at Fermilab in 2012. In back, left to right, Fermilab engineers Terry Tope, Barry Norris and David Montanari. In front, contractors Youhei Saitou, Michitaka Furikoma and Ryuzzo Kanno from IHI. Credit: Reidar Hahn, Fermilab
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    At right, top: The interior of the completed 35-ton-capacity LAr cryostat prototype (Oct 2012) Credit: D.Montanari, Fermilab

    At right, bottom: Structural support for the prototype cryostat walls (May 2012) Credit: D.Montanari, Fermilab
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  • The Big Bang produced large amounts of matter and antimatter. When matter and antimatter annihilated, some tiny asymmetry in the early universe...
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  • ...produced our universe, made entirely of matter. Did neutrinos cause the asymmetry? Credit: Hitoshi Murayama
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  • Scientists create neutrinos by smashing protons into a target. The protons create short-lived particles called pions and kaons, which then decay into neutrinos and other particles. Credit: Fermilab
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    • In Spring 2009, the Argon Neutrino Test detector at Fermilab recorded the first interaction of a neutrino. Credit: ArgoNeuT collaboration
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    • The Water Cherenkov neutrino detector of the Super-Kamiokande experiment in Japan comprises a tank filled with 50,000 tons of water and lined with more than 11,000 photomultiplier tubes. Credit: Kamioka Observatory, ICRR (Institute for Cosmic Ray Research), The University of Tokyo
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    • This event display shows the interaction of a muon neutrino inside the Super-Kamiokande detector. Credit: Super-Kamiokande collaboration

    Last modified: 08/26/2014 |